Snowed in and looking for something to do? Interested in the history of your local city? Then you’ll be thrilled to discover our brand new digital collection of the historic issues of the Black and Gold. We are currently scanning and uploading issues to our Ohio Memory website and have plans to add to this collection in the future.

You can read all about life in the 1930’s and 40’s in the Heights, including serious articles ruminating on the impending war with Europe and concerns about Hitler and the spread of fascism. Standing in stark relief to these grave misgivings are lighthearted articles with titles such as “Fred Records 57 New Conquests; That’s Two New Babes a Month!” or “Fifty-Seven Varieties of Red Heads Add Spice and Color to Heights!” Other articles dispense advice to fellow students on being courteous and conscientious, or chastise them for behavior like doodling on desks and talking loudly during assemblies.

These newspaper issues are both incredibly entertaining and also informative. Even during wartime regular life on the home front continues, and it is definitely an interesting exercise to reflect on how a community can unite in the face of serious hardship and adversity. So we invite you to peruse these articles, and please check back often to see what new issues have popped up since your last visit!

Also, if you happen to be interested in current issues of the Black and Gold please check out their wonderful website: The Black and Gold.

And don’t forget our other great historical resources on Ohio Memory such as Home Heritage Tour booklets dating back to 1977, and valuable books on Heights history such as The Proud Heritage of Cleveland Heights and In Our Day, Cleveland Heights: Its People, Its Places, Its Past. Or check out the phenomenal book on the history of the Heights library system by reading More Than Just Books by Marion Kelly.

More details on this project and access to our Ohio Memory can be found on our local history website https://heightslibrary.org/services/special-collections/local-history/, and in the pages of our Check Us Out winter publication.

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