Centennial 100: 1926-1936

This is part two of a Read/Watch/Listen bookmark series by the Heights Matchmakers, celebrating the Heights Libraries’ Centennial decade by decade!

bc8cfb92ac179ccbe3366fac778cbf96Books:

The Castle by Franz Kafka (1926)

Constant Reader by Dorothy Parker (1927-1933)

Well of Loneliness by Radclyffe Hall (1928)

Passing  by Nella Larsen (1929)

A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf (1929)

Strong Poison by Dorothy L. Sayers (1930)

The Joy of Cooking by Irma S. Rombauer (1931)

“In 1931, Irma Rombauer announced that she intended to turn her personal collection of recipes and cooking techniques into a cookbook. Cooking could no longer remain a private passion for Irma. She had recently been widowed and needed to find a way to support her family. Irma was a celebrated St. Louis hostess who sensed that she was not alone in her need for a no-nonsense, practical resource in the kitchen. So, mustering what assets she had, she self-published The Joy of Cooking: A Compilation of Reliable Recipes with a Casual Culinary Chat. Out of these unlikely circumstances was born the most authoritative cookbook in America, the book your grandmother and mother probably learned to cook from. To date it has sold more than 15 million copies.”

The Shape of Things to Come by H.G. Wells (1933)

Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie (1934)

A House Divided by Pearl S. Buck (1935)

imagesMovies:

The Jazz Singer (1927)

Horse Feathers (1932)

It Happened One Night (1934)

The Thin Man (1934)

Reefer Madness (1935)

“Propaganda film that relates the story, as told by High School Principle Dr. Carroll to parents at a PTA meeting, of the scourge of marijuana. The tale revolves around Mae and Jack, accomplices in the distribution of marijuana, who manage to entice the local High School kids to stop by Mae’s apartment to smoke reefer. The lives of all who are involved with this menace are inevitably shattered. One youngster becomes so addicted to the killer weed that a judge orders him to be committed for life to a mental hospital! Dr. Carroll advises us to not incur the same tragedy.”

Little Lord Fauntleroy (1936)

 

images (1)Music:

Bessie Smith, Empress of the Blues by Bessie Smith (1926-1933)

The OKeh Ellington by Duke Ellington (1927-1930)

An American in Paris by George Gershwin (1928)

The Birth of Swing by Benny Goodman (1935-1936)

 

 

CENTENNIAL-BUTTON-SINGLE-01-583x600Check out the other Centennial 100 Lists:

1916-1936

 

 

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